7 11 2005

Google Print Part 2

My friend shares an experience which boosts support for Google Print…

I have explored Google Print several times in the last 48 hours, and I stumbled across something remarkable. While searching the collection in Google’s virtual library for instances of my family surname, Robichau, I found something remarkable. A book by James W. Baker titled Plymouth Labor and Leisure (Images of America) contained an instance of the word “Robichau,” and clicking through the link brought me to a photo of my great uncle, Earl Robichau, from 1914. I could tell who the Robichau in the photograph was before looking at the list of names – the family resemblance is remarkable.

Never before could I have found such an obscure and wonderful gem. But, thanks to this new technology, I am able to research any topic with a degree of rigor never before possible. Until now, I could go to the library and search the index of a book that might or might not contain references to my topic of research (or, I could search the internet and hope to find a valid online source of information). Now, I have entire libraries of material that have been scanned and indexed – searchable to the letter.

The publishing world claims that Google print is their enemy. Tonight, Google Print prompted me to buy two “hardcopies” of books that I never would have purchased, or even known about, otherwise; I think that is good thing for the publishing world.

You can see my Great Uncle Earl in a photo of the Plymouth Cordage Company’s company baseball team for the 1914 season.

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